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"The Bomb"
Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
Ours is the first generation of Americans to have never known what the world was like pror to the use of atomic warfare. It has colored or entire world since the first public knowledge of the bomb in 1944. When Russia and the US began the Cold War and the threat of anialation of the human race was a very real possibility, the attitude of of Amerca's youth changed considerably. Our's began a generation of " Love, Peace, Drugs, Sex,because tomorrow may never come".

After six years of war the first atomic bombs were dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. More than 100,000 people were killed, and others subsequently died of radiation-induced cancers. The bombing brought the Second World War to an end. Despite the appalling death toll, the major powers raced to develop newer and more destructive bombs. By the 1950s uranium was also being used to generate electricity, with atomic power heralded as a cheap and clean source of energy.

Few actions of the United States government remain as controversial as the dropping of the atomic bombs on Japan to end World War II in the Pacific. On August 6, 1945, a single atomic bomb was dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. Three days later a second bomb was detonated at Nagasaki. No one at the time knew exactly what this new form of weaponry would accomplish, which was reason enough for several prominent American scientists to oppose its use. Within days it was obvious to the world that the United States possessed the most awesome and destructive technology imaginable. In 1944, a joint Army-Navy group, the United States Strategic Bombing Survey, had been organized to study the effect of the air war on the military, economic, and political structures of Germany and Japan. Their report on Hiroshima and Nagasaki enormously influenced both government policy and popular perceptions of atomic bombs.
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